à la carte blog

New Managing Editor: Zoe Shaw!

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We, at carte blanche, are thrilled to announce and welcome our new managing editor: Zoe Shaw! Shaw will be taking on the role of managing editor for our Winter 2020 “Visible/Invisible” (38) issue. Read on to read Shaw’s introductory post. Welcome!

2019 3Macs carte blanche Prize Finalists! Alexei Perry Cox, Maria Camila Arias, Eliza Robertson

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carte blanche is thrilled to announce the 2019 3Macs Prize Shorlist, as selected by juror and 2017 CBC Poetry Prize winner Alessandra Naccarato. The shortlisted writers are Alexei Perry Cox (poetry), Maria Camila Arias (fiction), and Eliza Robertson (fiction)!

Call for Submissions: Visible / Invisible

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Submissions for Issue 38 – Winter 2020 will be open between December 15th, 2019 – January 15th 2020. We will be accepting submissions on the theme Visible / Invisible. Get ready to send us your creative-Non Fiction (by Quebec residents), Fiction, Poetry, Translations, Photography and Comics. Read more →

Call for Applications! Managing Editor

Photo by Patrick Tomasso on Unsplash

The managing editor works closely with the editor-in-chief to help steer the magazine forward. The successful candidate will support and coordinate the editorial team in all aspects of production and promotion of three issues per year. In particular, they will oversee logistical matters relating to the successful and timely publication of every issue. This includes maintaining correspondence with authors, drafting author contracts and ensuring they are signed, managing submissions on Submittable, and uploading and formatting content for each issue. Read more →

The Hakawati and Me: The alarming inability to distinguish between the marginalised author and their fictional characters

The Clothesline Swing

I wonder sometimes if navigating the line between fiction and non-fiction and being steadily clear on which side of this line you’re on is a curse only authors of marginalized backgrounds and identities must balance on. The logic holds because, to my knowledge, non-marginalized authors are not asked about the truth in their fiction or the imagination in their memoirs: No one asks French-Canadian Booker winning author Yann Martel about his experiences living on a boat for 227 days with a tiger and a zebra. No one wonders if Elizabeth Gilbert inserted a bit of fiction into her memoir of eating pasta, practicing Shavasana, and drinking wine with a warm-blooded Latin lover.

A first time poetry editor confesses her hopes and dreams

marcelahuerta

Having entered the professional writing community slightly later in life, outside of an academic environment, and in a province that still felt new to me, I would have felt adrift if it wasn’t for Montreal’s literary scene. The sheer number of cultural events happening at any given time makes it nearly impossible not to engage with, and therefore, finding a community doesn’t become an insurmountable task. Read more →

Call for Submissions: Borders

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Borders. They can separate and define geographical locations and boundaries. Borders can be literal or invisible to the eye. Politics, language, ideology, philosophy, poetics, religion, family, sexuality, culture, all of these ideas exist within and without borders. What happens when we cross a border? When we step outside our comfort zones or are made to check a box? Read more →

The Repercussions of Separating the Art from the Living Artist

Audre Lorde

Whether or not to separate the art from the artist is often debated as though an abstract idea, yet, any decision produces tangible repercussions. Many discussions fail to consider that different responses may be warranted when focusing on the work of living artists, who use the power and platforms gained from their artistic success to cause harm. Upon discovering that authors we support are predatory, we have a decision to make on how we will interact with them as readers.