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à la carte blog

Coming Up in carte blanche Issue 28 Troubadours: Heather O’Neill and Madeleine Thien


As part of our upcoming Issue 28, we are thrilled to present a commissioned interview between two of Canada’s best-loved writers of their generation, Madeleine Thien and Heather O’Neill. In this brief excerpt, Thien and O’Neill talk about their hometown, Montreal, O’Neill as a native and Thien as an adopted daughter of the city. Stay tuned to Issue 28 (which goes live on November 7) for the entire conversation.

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Flash fiction, Detroit River, and bunnyhugs: An Interview with Jenny Ferguson, Author of Border Markers


Jenny Ferguson is a Canadian writer, editor, and teacher from many places. Her debut book, Border Markers (NeWest Press), a collection of interrelated flash fictions, was released this September. Brad de Roo chatted with her about the ambiguity of genres, the ubiquity of ghosts, and the reorienting power of flash. “Flash-or-micro fiction, as genre,” Jenny said, “likes to end on a turn, or a moment that asks the reader to re-evaluate what s/he has read.”

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Announcing Nick Mount as Juror of the 2016 3Macs carte blanche

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The 3Macs carte blanche Prize is awarded annually in recognition of an outstanding submission by a Quebec writer, artist or translator. The prize is sponsored by David Goodridge from MacDougall, MacDougall & MacTier (3Macs) Inc. We’re delighted to announce that this year’s finalists will be selected by professor, author and editor, Nick Mount, and announced at the Quebec Writers’ Federation Gala on November 22, 2016 at Montreal’s Corona Theatre.

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Monique Polak Reflects Back on Being the Inaugural CBC/QWF Writer in Residence


I don’t know about you, but when I’m in a rough spot or running out of steam, looking back at a joyful moment helps.

For me, one of those moments happened last November, when I learned I’d been selected to be the CBC/QWF’s first writer-in-residence. I still grin when I remember jumping up from my chair when my name was called during the QWF Literary Awards Gala.

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It’s time to enter the CNFC/carte blanche creative nonfiction competition!


We’re doing it again! carte blanche and the Creative Nonfiction Collective Society (CNFC) have teamed up to bring you a Canada-wide creative nonfiction contest sponsored by the University of King’s College. The winner will receive $750 and her/his text will be published in carte blanche.

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Head in the Gutter: A Profile of Comic Artist Avalon Moore


Avalon Moore is a comics artist based out of Nova Scotia that is releasing a few pages of her graphic novel, Between, online every week. Eve Nixen sat down with Avalon to talk about the creative process, relationships and finishing projects, no matter how challenging they become.

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Art & Love & Geneviève Castrée


Writing about my experience of someone else’s death feels like a million acupuncture needles at once—I know it’s serving some mysterious purpose, but it feels strange, surreal, selfish. I’ve decided to trust that it will do some good, and frankly, I don’t know what else to do.

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Listen to Nana Technology on ABC Radio

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We come bearing exciting news! Kirsten Fogg’s powerful essay Nana Technology, which won the 2015 carte blanche/CNFC competition for creative nonfiction and appeared in Issue 24 of the magazine, has been adapted by ABC National Radio in Australia.

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The Best Kind of Worldly Good—An Interview with Author Alice Petersen


New Zealander-Canadian author Alice Petersen’s first collection of short stories, All the Voices Cry (Biblioasis) won the 2012 Quebec Writer’s Federation Concordia University First Book Prize. Her newest collection Worldly Goods (Biblioasis) was released in May. Brad de Roo asked her about the object of books and the music of objects for carte blanche this July.

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Review: Fictive Justice

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It’s hardly a matter of speculation that Antonio Tabucchi (1943-2012) set his novels Pereira Declares (1994) and Tristano Dies (2004) against the backdrop of European fascism—the former at its onset and the latter after its fall—in order to inquire, by revealing the undisclosed consciousness of his protagonists, to what extent his era was different from theirs, and to what extent it was the same.

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